Archive for October, 2014

Was The Dallas Ebola Patient Misdiagnosed?

Posted On : October 15, 2014,   Time : 11:05 am

Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian national who died of the Ebola at a Dallas hospital last week, was sent home from the emergency room of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital after being diagnosed with a 103-degree fever, the New York Times reported. Duncan, who had contracted the virus while in Liberia and was making his first visit to the U.S. to see relatives, was diagnosed as being in stable condition when he visited the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital's emergency room on Sept. 25. He was sent home with an antibiotics prescription – useless against a viral disease such as Ebola – and told to take Tylenol. Duncan was admitted to the hospital on Sept. 28 after his condition became much worse. He died from his Ebola infection on Oct. 8. As a result of the misdiagnosis, a hospital spokesperson told the New York Times that Texas Health Presbyterian “made changes to our intake process as well as other procedures to better screen for all critical indicators of Ebola virus. read more

A Painful Neurologic Disorder Is Often Misdiagnosed

Posted On : October 13, 2014,   Time : 7:44 pm

Trigeminal neuralgia – a neurological disorder that often causes terrible pains in the face – is often misdiagnosed, according to the Asbury Park Press newspaper. The condition – which occurs when a blood vessel in the face or head compresses the trigeminal nerve – is often misdiagnosed as a dental condition due to the fact it is a relatively rare disorder. It is characterized by intense, stabbing pain that can be triggered by chewing or speaking. Patients often go to several healthcare professionals without obtaining the proper diagnosis, sometimes even undergoing unnecessary root canal surgeries. Appropriate treatments for trigeminal neuralgia inc read more

First Assessment of National Telemedicine Service Finds Efforts Appear to Expand Access to Acute Medical Care

Posted On : October 9, 2014,   Time : 9:18 pm

People who are younger, more affluent and do not have established healthcare relationships are more likely to use a telemedicine program that allows patients to get medical help — including prescriptions — by talking to a doctor over the telephone, according to a new Rand Corporation study. Patients who used the service suffered from a wide assortment of acute medical problems such as respiratory illnesses and skin problems, and researchers found little evidence of misdiagnosis or treatment failure among those who used the service. “Telemedicine services such as the one we studied that directly links physicians and patients via telephone or Internet have the potential to expand access to care and lower costs,” said Lori Uscher-Pine read more

SecondOpinionExpert Launches Nation’s First Truly Universal, Patient-Oriented Electronic Health Record Service

Posted On : October 9, 2014,   Time : 8:29 am

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE SecondOpinionExpert Launches Nation's First Sharable, Patient-Centric Electronic Health Record Service Patients, Healthcare Professionals and Family Members Can Access eHRs Anywhere In U.S. or World DANA POINT, CA., October 9, 2014 – Every day, tens of thousands of Americans seek treatment at hospital emergency rooms or meet with a new physician. They all face a similar dilemma: They are unable to quickly and seamlessly share their medical records with their healthcare providers. SecondOpinionExpert (www.secondopinionexpert.com) solves this problem through its unique, proprietary electronic health records (eH read more

42 Percent Of Medicare Patients Subjected To Unnecessary Treatments

Posted On : October 6, 2014,   Time : 10:34 pm

A new study published by the American Medical Association’s journal on internal medicine concluded that 42 percent of Medicare patients have been subjected to some medical procedure or treatment that conferred little benefit to their health, the Newsmax website has reported. The study focused on 2009 Medicare data, honing in on 26 procedures that may be overused, includi read more