Excess Imaging Has A Fiscal — And Personal — Cost

Posted On : December 5, 2014,   Time : 8:26 am

A new study has concluded that unnecessary medical imaging in conjunction with cardiac stress tests not only costs the healthcare system more than $500 million annually but also creates enough radiation exposure to give 491 Americans cancer each year. Using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, the study’s authors concluded that imaging with a cardiac stress test rose from 59 percent of the time in the early 1990s to 87 percent of the time by 2010. Meanwhile, the percentage of patients who underwent a stress test without the presence of cardiac disease rose more than 50 percent during that same time period. As a result, the researchers concluded that nearly 35 percent of cardiac stress imaging tests are unnecessary. That’s

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Radiologists Pushed To Get Results To Patients Faster

Posted On : December 1, 2014,   Time : 7:10 pm

A move is on for patients to obtain radiology results far sooner than has been the norm. According to the New York Times, some patients wait weeks for radiology results that may indicate whether they have cancer or some other serious health issue. Both the Radiological Society of North America and the American College of Radiology have created initiatives to make radiologists more accessible to patients and to hand over test results immediately when asked. At SecondOpinionExpert, our clients receive their medical second opinions within two business days of submitting their medical records and a questionnaire specific to their medical condition. For more information about our medical second opinion service, contact us at

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Access To Medical Records Can Improve Data Sharing, Personal Care

Posted On : November 22, 2014,   Time : 8:41 am

A new study in the Journal of Medical Internet Research concluded that patients who have access to some form of their medical records in an electronic format were more likely to share the data with family members and friends and pay closer attention to their health. The study of more than 4,500 subjects in the eastern U.S. and Pacific Northwest was conducted by researchers at the University of Washington. It focused on the use of OpenNotes, a file sharing application that lets patients view the medical notes compiled by their physicians. The study concluded that more than 55 percent of the study participants who reported viewing at least one set of notes compiled by their doctor would like the opti

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Is That Knee Replacement Surgery Really Necessary?

Posted On : November 18, 2014,   Time : 4:37 pm

A knee replacement is one of the most common forms of surgery in the United States, with more than 600,000 people undergoing the procedure each year – more than double the rate of a decade ago. The numbers of knee replacement surgeries are only expected to rise as the American population continues to age. But are all knee replacements truly necessary? The New York Times suggests that in many instances they're not. For example, even though patients between the ages of 45 and are experiencing the greatest growth in knee replacements, the parts wear out after 20 years or so. That means these patients will likely need to undergo an additional knee replacement during their lifetime. Researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University also concluded that up to a third of subjects who underwent a knee replacement were not really good candidates for the procedure, with many only suffering from minor arthritis or pain when they went under the knife. After they had their

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Six Ways Electronic Health Records Can Benefit Patients

Posted On : November 13, 2014,   Time : 10:00 pm

Patients can benefit in a multitude of ways by having some say on their electronic health records, but the publication MedCityNews zeroes in on five specific reasons: It improves patient participation in their own healthcare decision-making The patient can easily recall their entire medical history if they visit a new doctor for care Prescriptions, vaccinations and other physician notes are far more legible than in their original handwritten form Scheduling appointments are far easier for patients A complete medical history is at the fingertips of all clinicians   But perhaps the most important reason is that patients have control over their medical records. The New York Times has reported that it can take weeks for patients to obtain their traditional paper records from their doctors, often requiring multiple phone calls and f

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